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Boyd Lipham's Fundraiser:

Bicycle America for AFI

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Boyd Lipham

THE STORY:

AFI has served Polk County’s developmentally and intellectually disabled adults since 1954 and provides basic education and vocational training to 100 individuals daily.  AFI strives to empower those with disabilities and work each day toward fulfilling our mission, “Offering individuals with disabilities the avenues to explore and experience personal growth and achievement through awareness, education, community resources and personal relationships.”

As these individuals work toward building relationships, developing necessary skills for employment, and ultimately achieving an independent way of life, it is critical that AFI continues to provide the education, experience and exposure that will enable them to reach their goals of personal independence. Unfortunately, with rising costs and the rapid decline of government funding it has become increasingly more difficult to serve these individuals. Recently, the Florida Legislature passed a budget that eliminated the Adults with Disabilities grant that funded AFI's long running Adult Basic Education program. AFI lost their teachers and equipment, at a moments notice.

In order to call attention to this situation and to enable AFI to continue providing the services that their clients have come to trust, I am riding across the country to raise awareness and money to support the education program at AFI. I will try to report back on this site throughout my trip.  Please feel free to send emails, tweets and most importantly donations to support this remarkable organization. With your help We will be able to continue to plant the seeds of independence for the individuals attending AFI and do so for years to come! www.afi-fl.org

Follow My Journey on My Blog at http://boydsbikeamerica.blogspot.com/

Thank You In Advance!

Boyd

 

Monday, July 27, 2015

Day 11. Lincoln, MT to Great Falls, MT

Awaking in Lincoln, MT to 49 degrees certainly started the day off crisp. I had shirt, jacket, arm warmers and vest on to start the day.  

Before hitting the road in earnest, I had breakfast at the famous Lambkins of Lincoln. My brother-in-law Gene Cummings grew up in that region and initially told me that their breakfast was great. I certainly cannot dispute that fact. I ordered eggs, hash browns (a staple since in Idaho that literally covers the plate), sausage and sourdough. It sounds rather standard until you taste the sausage that has a sweet veneer of molasses or similar that makes it incredible. I have a very filling breakfast, which I need since the next stop with food is 55+ miles. At my pace, carrying the load, that's over 5 hours away. 

As I take my leave of Lambkins, two older horsemen pull up in their trucks and trailers. As they shuffle in, the oldest asked me "which way you pointing horse, east or west". I tell him east. He asked me where I am headed and I tell him Great Falls for the day and Bar Harbor, ME is the ultimate destination. He responds, "Bar Harbor, Maine?", with a manner that seems to confirm to him the clown I must appear to be wearing yellow and black shirt, red socks, lime green vest and arm warmers. He bids me farewell with a "Well, good luck".  

This highlight of the ride was crossing the Continental Divide on a bicycle. I must admit, that felt kind of cool. I was climbing about the first 19 miles to Rogers Pass (the point that marks the Divide on the route) that got pretty steep right at the end. I stopped at the top for a few selfies of my bike and I. Took a quick break and started the descent that was indeed steep. The crosswinds on the descent were heavily striking my bags and my bike on the way down, forcing me to constantly feather the breaks to maintain stability.  

Once I cleared the steepest descent, I had hoped for a downhill ride into Great Falls. It should be, right? Well Gene had warned me there were some big rollers for about 30 miles after the summit. Oh boy, was he right. Some of the those rollers were sharp ascents that made me put in quite an effort that I was hoping to avoid. Just to add some fun, the wind was out of the ESE at 10-12 mph, gusting higher at times. On one 6% downhill run, the wind was so stiff I could only muster 26 MPH. That was a longer 30 miles than I had hoped for.  

As I made my way over the pass, the trees became immediately sparse and ultimately extinct. The land opened up to massive rolling fields that as one sign read was "prime cattle country". The distant mountains became extensions of the sky. This is Big Sky Country. There is a lot of both, sky and country.  

Ultimately the rollers end and there is a long downhill into Simms, some 55 milesfrom the start. In the distance, green pastures and trees appear to mark where the town will be and where I plan for lunch. I look forward to both, shade trees and lunch. I get half. As I pedal past the sign the says Simms, the auto parts/convenient store is closed (it is Sunday). The cafe looks like it has been closed for a while. Oh well, Fort Shaw is only 6 miles away. Nothing. Sun River is 4 miles away. Nothing. Vaughn is 12 miles away. Aha. So 75+ miles in, I feast on a lunchable at a convenient store.  

It really was not that big of an issue. I had packed four Mojo peanut bars, had some electrolytes and 3 bottles of water plus the MSR bladder full of water. I used them all, but was never out of food nor water.  

After the lunch feast, which was timed well since a rain storm passed, I took off for the last 12 miles to Great Falls. The winds shifted out of the west and I enjoyed a slight downhill ride to the finish.  

I am staying next to the fairgrounds where the Montana State Fair is going on. I plan to investigate tomorrow. 

Posted by Boyd Lipham at 7:43 AM  
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Saturday, July 25, 2015

Day 10. Missoula to Lincoln, MT

Today's 78 mile trek started out quite chilly, with temperatures in the high fifties. It was several hours before it warmed up enough to me to cycle without a jacket.  No complaints here, it is much easier pedaling in cool temperatures.  
Leaving Missoula, the route was primarily on Hwy 200 and followed the Clark Fork River and then the Blackfoot River.  Being Saturday, the fishermen were already on the rivers in various flotilla, including boats, kayaks, rafts, etc.  
After about 20 miles, the route moved away from the rivers.  At that point several things started changing. The traffic that went past changed from fishermen to "explorers" with trucks topped with kayaks and pick-ups filled with four-wheelers.  The kayakers headed to more intense rapids, I suppose, and the off-roaders to explore the vast country that is Montana.    The land changed as well.  The mountains became the backdrop as the land opened up to broader fields, pastures and prairies. The auburn hued bark of the Ponderosa Pine that dominated the landscape began to be mixed with broad-leaf and white trunk stands of Birch and Alder trees.  
The main events of the day, however, were the critter sightings.

The deer were prevalent.  While I am impressed, apparently others are not.  At breakfast in downtown Missoula, I saw a mother and fawn out by the river.  During the ride, I saw numerous, including a foursome that loped from the side of the mountain to feast on wildflowers in a meadow.  They were not bothered by the motorized traffic that zoomed past, but were certainly troubled by a bicyclist slowly spinning alongside the road in a bright yellow vest.  I was able to snap a few decent pictures of them before they had enough of this stranger, and effortlessly cleared the fence and the road before they scampered up the other mountain slope.  
A herd of Elk in the distance, prairie dogs comically scampering about, chipmunks laughing as they out-pace me up a hill, even a badger, should be added to the list of sightings.  Also, beavers and river otters from the days before.  
A Bald Eagle soared above my route for several minutes.  He was quite intimating, to tell the truth.  Barn Swallows, American Kestrels, Red-Winged Black-Birds and Western Tanager (very colorful) were all spotted as well.  I hope to learn how to identify more in the coming weeks.  
After a lunch stop at a convenience store, the tailwinds picked up for the last 40 miles where I am over-nighting in Lincoln, MT (pop. 1000).  Tomorrow is about 90 miles to Great Falls, MT. 

Pandora mix:   Stevie Wonder.  Yes, indeed.
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 9:13 PM  
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Friday, July 24, 2015

Stats. Week 1

We have completed the first week of the journey, eight days actually. 

First, the most important stat.   Amazingly, we have already raised over $6000 dollars for AFI.  Thank you all very much for your support and generosity.  For those that have intended, but have not hit the contribution button yet, this weekend is the perfect time.   Please continue to share with those whom you know would be interested and let's blow past our goal. 

Cycling stats thus far:

690 Miles
27,270 feet climbed
59 hours in the saddle
4 states
1 time zone changed

And we have only just begun.
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 8:13 PM  
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Day 9. Rest Day

It is nice to wake up knowing that it is a day of rest with little to do but casually investigate downtown Missoula, MT.  After a large potato-laden breakfast at the hotel and a visit to the Sparkle laundry mat, I was off to slowly pedal around the city. 

My first stop was to Greenough Park, where my sister and her husband got married ever so many decades ago.  It is a 50 acre park that stretches nearly a mile along the rattlesnake creek.  It was donated by the Greenough family in 1902. Beyond its acclaim as the site of the Cummings Wedding, it is well-known for its bird-watching.  Well over 120 species of birds have been spotted in this park alone.  With my trusty Bushnell binoculars, I was able to spot of few of the more common or well-known birds.  Included in my short list was the pileated wood-pecker, cedar waxwing, kingfisher, dove, dipper and sparrows of variety that I could not identify specifically.  There were many other that I could not name, but tried to make mental notes to look them up later.  I even saw two bats swooping over the creek.   As if to validate the park for its bird-spotting prowess, several organized groups, including school children, were quietly treading through the trails with their binoculars aloft, scanning the trees. 

After a slice of spinach, tomato and rosemary pie from Bridge Pizza, it was time to pedal around downtown.   It is certainly a bicycle friendly city and is almost dominated by bike traffic.  Adventure Cycling, the resource I relied on for maps and trip details, is in downtown Missoula.  After perusing a few of the shops, I picked up some needed provisions for the days ahead.  While enjoying some afternoon refreshment by the river, it was relaxing to watch small groups float by on a variety of craft and to enviously see an angler land a small trout. 

After some afternoon rest, I am off for a little tapas for dinner and then to prep for the ride to Lincoln, MT.  On the road again, as they say.

 Pandora mix of the day:  Willie Nelson
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 7:53 PM  
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Day 8. Powell, Idaho to Missoula, MT

Yesterday was a planned short day into Missoula.  Short days are needed.  
The days starts with a 2400ft climb to Lolo pass.  My initial question was will I actually be bored with the scenery as I plod to the top?   Nope.  It was sensational.  The climb itself is about 12 miles with the last 3 miles at a 6% grade that I lugged my 75+lbs of bike and gear up at a sound barrier breaking 5mph.  
With relief, I reach the top of Lolo Pass.  At the apex and off the the right is a rest area and a logged welcome center.  I take advantage of both.  In the welcome center they have a historical area, gift shop, along with free teas and coffee.  After leaving a donation in the appropriate box, I select a tea blend of Rooibos, Cinnamon, Orange Peel, and Cloves called Montana Gold.  It is quite delicious.  In the corner of the historical area is a looped film being shown surrounded by large comfortable chairs.  It looks too inviting to pass up, so I settle in for a relaxing break.  
I learn that the nearby  range is called the Bitterroot Mountains.  They get their name from the bitterroot that grow in the area.  The native legend has it that a grand matriarch of the Nez Perce, during one exceptionally harsh season, prayed and wept for food and nourishment for her family.  Her tears cascaded over her long gray hair and turned into bitterroot in the soil.  The bitterroot was staple of the diet for these Native Americans and is still harvested to this day.  
As I make my leave from the pass, I immediately enter Montana and the mountain time zone.   Changing time zone strikes me significantly.  The rest of the ride is primarily downhill into Missoula, MT.  
On my descent, there is Lolo Warms Springs.  I stop there for lunch a restaurant.  I order a chicken sandwich and get a ham and cheese sandwich (I think).  It is an odd little place that lacks for a certain attention to detail.  There is a TV on in the corner that is playing Filed of Dreams, so I am in no hurry.  I am finished eating, but wait around for the vignette of Archibald Moonlight Graham (Burt Lancaster), ending with Terrance Mann (James Earl Jones) speech, "Ray, people will come Ray".  I wish I was a cool as "Doc" Graham.  
The scenery changes into Montana, the large rushing rivers I have been following giveaway to creeks and streams.  The land is surrounded by mountains, but opens up into more meadows and fields as I descend.  Looks like prime country for Moose.  Indeed I pass signs that read Moose Crossing and Moose meadow.  But to no avail that afternoon, I did not see one.  
I enter Missoula through intermittent rain.  Storms look to be brewing, but I get in before the worst of it.  As I am working my way through town, I ride into the campus of the University of Montana, the Grizzlies.  This is where my sister and brother-in-law (Gene and Beth Cummings) went to school.  I am sure much has changed from the single room log cabin school they attended 30 years ago.  It is a beautiful campus that appears to be thriving and expanding.  I note the large white M on the mountain behind the college.   I am encouraged to climb to it....but I think I will pass.  
I had planned to camp in Missoula, but with the storms approaching, I have a decision to make.  Do I sleep in a real bed with a pillow (not a wadded up jacket) that is out of the weather and comfortably climatized, with a shower... or in a tent?   OK, so it was not much of a choice.  With a rest day in front of me, I opt for the hotel.  I use my hotel points, it is "free".  
Pandora mix of the day:   Baseball.  John Fogerty, Centerfield.  Bruce Springsteen, Glory Days.  Terry Cashman, Talking Baseball.  
"You know we just don't recognize the most significant moments of our lives while they're happening. Back then I thought, well, there'll be other days. I didn't realize that that was the only day."  -- Doc Archibald Graham.  
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 11:06 AM  
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Thursday, July 23, 2015

Day 7. Idaho

"...our inexpressible joy".   That was a quote I read today by Meriwether Lewis as his team cleared the mountains in Idaho.    

That was my feeling exactly.   Yesterday I pedaled next to the Clearwater and Lochsa rivers. It was what I had imagined this trip out west to be.  Picture, if you will, curvaceous rivers with random Rapids, dotted with the occasional fly-fisherman. Their banks forming cliffs of pine, spruce and fir that provided cooling shade and sweet aromas.  Now imagine that for 94 miles. That was my day.  

It was a steady climb of 4200 feet into Powell, Idaho.  After some requisite oatmeal at the camp, I left about 6am to begin the route.  I took a long stop about 31 miles later in Lowell, for a full breakfast at the last cafe for 60+ miles.  After breakfast, I loaded up on energy bars and water from the convenient store for the final miles.  I took my time, stopping often to enjoy the cool river.  

To enhance the ride, along the way, there were deer, turkey, beaver and numerous birds, including osprey and geese.

As miserable as I felt during some of the trek through the desert mountains of Washington, if felt equally joyous on the long climb today.  This was fun.  

I set up camp in the grass behind the Lochsa Lodge convenient store.  It was free.   Showers were $5 bucks, but they supplied a cotton towel.  Worth it. 

A couple of other cyclist camped there as well.  Joel was from Spokane, WA and was a big Tyler Johnson fan, and by extension, a Lightning fan. Needless to say we bored the other by talking hockey.  

They had a restaurant at the Lodge where the food was quite delicious.  I plan to have breakfast there before starting our for Missoula, MT, which is only 67 miles away.  

Pandora mix of the day: by suggestion ----   Hootie and the Blowfish with Time, Desert Mountain Showdown, I Go Blind.
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 3:52 PM  
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Day 6. Along the Clearwater River to Kamiah

I left Lewiston early in the morning in 60 degree weather.  The dry climate temperature changes do indeed swing greatly.  High 90s at 8 pm the previous evening to a cool 67 in the morning.  I was certainly grateful, if not slightly chilled to start the day.  

Today I spent the day riding on Hwy 12, next to the Clearwater River.  Surprisingly,  I enjoyed this scenery much better than the Columbia Gorge.  First, it was accessible.  Numerous points to pull off and view the scenery or go down to the river bank. I was able to take more time and take advantage of a few of these.  Through the Columbia, the railroad tracks (with heavy rail traffic) and the distance from the road prevented access.  Second, there were trees and winding bends with flowing rapids made for one beautiful ride.  

The road on the 70 mile route, was narrow, rough asphalt and little to no shoulder.  So not always comfortable, but nothing remotely startling happened.  The rough asphalt was the biggest bother.  A light wind was in my face in the morning.  After a lunch stop for Mexican in Orpino, the head shot up, but the prevailing winds were at my back into Kamiah.  

There were a few notable route detours today.  One was on a bike trail out of Lewiston, that saved me from much of the heavy work traffic.  The second was a cut through the Nez Perce park that put me out on a closed road now used for walking and biking. 

I set up my tent in Long Camp RV park, which is close where Lewis and Clark wintered for 6 months with the Nez Perce in 1806.  

After PB&J on a tortilla for dinner, I have enjoyed resting and recovering while spotting a few elk and a variety of birds.  Most of which I am working to identify.  

Tomorrow is a big 90+ mile day that is climbing most of the way, according to the map.  That one is going to take a while with lots of rest stops.  

Pandora Mix of the Day:   by suggestion, Chris Mullins.  
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 10:23 PM  
 

Monday, July 20, 2015

Day 5. On to Idaho


After restful night in my tent, where I could look up through the mesh and see the brilliant display of stars, I broke camp about 6am to head to Idaho.  

I did get to Pomeroy along the way and they did indeed have a public pool.  I was so looking forward to a respite from the heat.  However the pool did not open until 1pm.  Upon stopping at Tania's cafe (where I scarfed peanut butter pancakes), I received intel to wait and swim in the Snake River, closer to Lewiston.  So I did.  I had to pay five dollars to enter the Chief Timothy Park, but I had a refreshing swim, followed by an ice cream bar. 

The ride was good today.   As a matter of fact, except for the incessant heat, this was a very good day.  With 12mph tailwinds most of the way along with some long descents (preceded by some climbs, of course), it was an easier day. The scenery was endless rolling fields of wheat, hay, and other crops, interrupted by a small town or two.  It even came with the requisite tumbleweed to make the picture complete.  As a matter of fact, in one downhill, I was dodging tumbleweed and trucks.  My own 4D video game at 30+ mph.  

One other small highlight.  At a rest stop on the final climb, I pulled next to a building to get some shade.  In between the crack openings was a nest of birds.  Barn swallows, I think. Their mother was feeding them and she was amazingly fast, finding food and zipping right back out again.  I watched her for several minutes as she picked out a different chick to feed in a blink of an eye.  I was mesmerized.  Nevertheless, I had a swim in the Snake River in my future, so I had to leave them be.  

Pandora: On that last note, the mix of the day will be: The Byrds, Lynyrd Skynyrd (figure it out), and Bob Marley (Three Little Birds).   




Posted by Boyd Lipham at 6:13 PM  
 

Day 4. Umatilla to Lewis and Clark trail State Park



Yesterday was about 79 miles that started to take me away from the Columbia River, heading north.  The area is dominated by a wide range of agriculture, but from my perspective, dominated by wheat.  The rolling hills laden with farm houses are as picturesque as you would imagine.  

The best part of the day was spending about 5 hours in Walla Walla to avoid the scorching heat- even the bike needed shade. There is a nice main street with a variety of eateries and wineries that dominate the area.  I enjoyed lunch at a very laid back place called Olive, where they let me hangout in sofa chair for part of the afternoon.  


The break turned out to be a great strategy, one learned the hard way the day before. At about 5pm, it was still 98 degrees, but it was time to head to the campsite.  The route was a much more rural road so I was actually closer to the fields and homesteads. Along the way I startled an elk (and vice versa) that was down in the hay field.  She was away before I could get stopped and get a picture.  

The campsite is a nice primitive site just a few feet away from a creek.  I enjoyed its quiet solitude.  

I met Fran from London as I was leaving Walla Walla.  She was doing a Westbound tour.  She gave me a heads up that there is a public pool in Pomeroy, a town along today's route.  I plan to break there early afternoon.   

Pandora Mix. Today is on to Lewiston, so: Huey Lewis and the News will be our lead. Have not listened to them in quite some time.  

Day 3. Evergreen State?


Yesterday, Saturday the 18th, was 91 miles from Maryhill State Park to Umatilla, Oregon. Started the day with a flat tire and an immediate climb of about 800 feet.  Continued the day with 99 degree temps and two places for water over 83 miles.  Ended the day being chased by dogs followed by another steep climb to my resting place.  In Umatilla, the only close place to eat was a dive (being polite) where the host was tossing a pot of who knows what out the front door, telling me they could fry me up something if I wanted it.  Not my favorite day.


 


So for the greater part of the last two days I have been through arid, hot climate, limited trees and scorching heat.  This sound like the Evergreen State to you? Nope. Apparently the people that named it all live in the Eastern part of the State where it rains, I was told. Where I was today gets about 6" of rain a year. 


Despite all of the trials of the day, it was full of amazing views, with vineyards and fruit farms dotting  the horizons.  All of them irrigated by the ever-present Columbia River.  The natural land was of long dry grasses with rocky out-croppings and windmills, that I did not imagine in Washington.  Beautiful, but must admit I would have rather viewed them from air-conditioned transport.  Toward the end of the ride was heavy agriculture: wheat, onions, and watermelon.  Really amazing in this climate.  The Columbia River supports all of this.

The Columbia also support hydro-power through the series of dams.   They produce more than they can use and sell the great majority of their power to California, I am told. 

Next segment includes a stop in Walla Walla, Washington.  Looking forward to the respite. 

Pandora mix:  With windmills, vast land and the heat (including the wildfires they are fighting), it brings to mind one thing:   Earth, Wind and Fire.   That should do it. 












Posted by Boyd Lipham at 4:09 PM  
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Saturday, July 18, 2015

Day - 2. Portland to Maryhill State Park.

Day two route was on the Washington side of the Columbia River, through the gorge.  There were some impressive vistas along the way.  The day was long, with another 103 mile day and 5400ft of climbing.  There is only one more 100 mile day on the trip and I am grateful to have these two behind me. 

The day started out crossing a bridge into Washington on the interstate.  There is literally a walled bike path in the middle of the highway.  That is a bike friendly town.  I ended up on hwy14 that was very active with 4 lane traffic for a bit, but settled into two way road with moderate traffic for the remainder of the ride.  Roads were good.   Bridge, pass, and tunnel crossings were narrow, but all good.  Tunnels were nerve racking. 

I will show more pictures of today's route when they are easier to upload.  I want to spend just a second talking about people I met so far.

Several people have been interested in what I am doing and have asked for the blog and donation site.  From Sherean, who owned the Italian restaurant in Portland.  Neal Beitelspacher, who is from Fargo, ND and offered to get me discount lodging there.  A group a 8 at the big creek coffeehouse.  There have been several others, but I want to mention three special people today. 

First, I stopped for an egg sandwich at Robbie's "all things good" antique shop and cafe in Stevenson, WA.  We got to talking about the trip and why we were raising money.  Robbie employs 6 adults with disabilities in their small town and is a leader for their community. Check out here Facebook page and make sure you stop in if you ever find yourself there.  Thy recently had a ball for the adults and it was a huge hit.

Second.  I mentioned the tunnels were a bit harrowing.  They are narrow, dark, and have no shoulder.  There were seven and most of them were thankfully relatively short.  I knew about them, but had also been warned about these from a guy earlier in the trip.  Before a bike enters, you press a button that starts a flashing light that is supposed to warn drivers that a cyclist is in the tunnel.  The light did not scream a bright enough warning for my taste.  They should add sirens and a barrier, but I digress.  As I was about to enter a series of the longer tunnels, a truck pulls off the road behind me.  As I pressed the button to enter, he turned on his flashers and escorted me through.  Good people.

Finally, as I set up camp in the state park, I must have looked pretty tired or pitiful.  (I was). The family from New Orleans in the site next to mine insisted that I eat hamburgers and ribs with them.  I refused at first, but was thankful for their persistence.   Far better than the PBnJ that I was going to have on a tortilla.   They even walked me over a s'mores.  It was delicious and I hate marshmallows
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 6:02 AM  
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Friday, July 17, 2015

Day 1. Astoria to Portland

The tour starts in Astoria, OR, the terminus of the Lewis and Clark expedition. In 1805 the endured the winter there, hoping to catch a ship from there.  However, the concluded their journey in their camp and returned home.   It is considered one of the oldes settlements in the west.

The Start



The route today was 104 miles. Oops.  I was planning on 84.  With a detour in the middle, and some extra miles at each end, it was further than anticipated.  But we had a favorable tailwind (thanks mom and pop) so it was a very good trip and gives confidence for the long days ahead.  Including another 100 mile century on Friday (today).  

 Weather predictions were for a gorgeous day, zero percent chance of rain.   So, I started in a light rain drizzle for the first 10-15 miles.  I guess in Oregon, that is not really rain.   It did clear up to be as predited, a perfect day for riding.

The route here has wide shoulders, for the most part, and is comfortable pedaling.  I must admit though, that when the log trucks come barreling by, that is not my favorite part of the day.  However, their trailing vortex and the sweet cedar aromas almost off-set my temporary heart arrhythmia.

I climbed 3600 feet today.  The uphills, while slow (as low as 5mph) and hard, they are the best time to enjoy the scenery.   The downhills (up to 40mph) are of course fun and a relief from the climbs.  (Blake, just like the elementary walkway run, only steeper and without the stairway crash at the end)

For today, we head across the Columbia River to the Washington side.  I can't wait to see the river gorge.   It is a long day, over 100 miles and ends on quite a climb.   So, just planning to take my time.   The overnight is at MaryHill State Park.  

Pandora Mix of the day:  Theme is travelling, so;  Bakithi Kumalo (Transmigration album), Journey (obvious, I suppose), Traveling Wilburys (seems appropriate)
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 6:23 AM  
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Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Prologue. Portland for Provisions.

Wow.  Can you believe that we have already raised over $3,000 before the first official day.  Thank you all very much.  Amazing.  Please continue to share with all those you know who would be interested and let's crush this goal.  Dan Berman has been the one to make all of this happen. Within a matter of days, we had a site, video, photos and a terrific article from Eric Pera at The Ledger.  

Well, the bike assembly and provision acquisition day went smoothly.  I was able to get the extraneous gear and transport bags shipped back home, stop by REI for fuel and bear spray, and pick up some energy food.  The only hitch today was that my new lock strategy for my Krytpon cable failed.  So that was fun leaving my bike and gear outside while I was foraging a store for a better lock.  Took two stops, but I got what I needed without my stuff being stolen.  Regardless, I had time to bike around Portland a bit. 

Portland
....is fantastic.  I have often said if I did not live in FL, I would live in the PacNW. Nothing has changed my mind so far.  I don't think Brenda is of the same mindset.  Weather here today was perfect.  Let's see how long it last. (Hillary, someone had put a simple red sticker that read "eating meat" on stop signs around the area I was in....)

Tour Route
The tour officially kicks off tomorrow from Astoria, OR.  I am excited and anxious to get started after all the preparations and logistics are complete.  I will be doing part of the Lewis and Clark trail, in reverse, for the first several segments.  More on that in the coming days.  Tomorrow is about 84 miles back to Portland.   As I was taking the bus out here tonight, I was lost in a trance of the timber landscape, accompanied by the moan and whine of the Diesel engine as it struggled up some hills.  Then the trance was broken with an inner pang of reality that I had to pedal those again tomorrow in
a two-wheeled tank.  I foresee more moaning and whining.  Actually, I am looking forward to it.

Pandora mix of the day. 
Pandora will get me me through many of these miles, I would suppose.  I plan to create a different artist "mix of the day", based on any inspiration or whim.  I would love to hear your suggestions.  For tomorrow, the choice is easy.  Since the most common remark I have gotten regarding this trip is some form of "that is crazy", the inaugural mix will be:   Ozzy (Crazy Train),  Aerosmith (Crazy), Prince (Let's go crazy)

Time to get this started, so look for shorter blogs and more pictures.
Posted by Boyd Lipham at 10:31 PM  
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Tuesday, July 14, 2015

The Tour Details

Arrived safely in Portland, OR.  All the gear arrived as well, apparently after being thoroughly inspected by TSA.  They opened and searched each of my bags and left me little love notes, informing me of same.  Apparently, that test was passed.  So, tomorrow (Wednesday) I only need to assemble the bike, pick up some provisions and catch a bus to Astoria.  

Before I head out, I thought I would share a few of the boring details of the tour, for those so inclined.  Um, enjoy?
Theoretically, the post will be more interesting (dare we say mesmerizing ) going forward.  

Bike:

Ridgeback Panorama  

 

Gear Set: Shimano Deore XT
Chainrings: 48/36/26T
Shimano Cassette 11-32 9sp
Pedals: Shimano M324 SPD
Rims: Alex DH-19  36H
Hubs: Shimano Deore
Tires: Continental Contact 
Weight: 13.7kg

Route:

Unsupported (Code for: me, my bike and about 19kg of gear)
6100km+ (3800mi+)
14 States: WA, OR, ID MT, ND, MN, WI, MI, OH, PA, NY, VT, NH, ME
2 Countries (Going into Canada -- just because)
59 Days:  52 Pedaling, 7 Rest 

Partial Packing List:

Ortleib Panniers -- Front and Back
Tubus front and rear racks
Sierra Designs Tent, Sleeping Bag, Therma-Rest NeoAir mattress
Off-bike clothing:  1 Pant, 2 shirts, Capilene base layers, Adidas Watershoe
On-bike clothing: Helmet, Bolle Sunglasses, Gloves, 2 kits, 2 socks, arm/leg warmers, MTB shoes
Two jackets: Frogg Togg Rain, Arcteryx Gamma Softshell
Safety: Bear Bag, Bear Spray, First Aid Kit
Camp Equip: MSR Water filter, JetBoil Flash Cook System, Bushnell HD Legend
Bike Tools/Equip: Crank Bros Multi19, Leatherman Micro, Knife, 2 tubes, 1 tire
Book: (Yes, I know you can read them electronically -- its not the same)
Maps: AdventureCycling.com have great route maps
Electronics:  GoPro, iPad mini, iPhone, Mophie Battery
Advil, SeatSaver, Aquaphor, Skinners, BioFreeze (you get the picture)




Posted by Boyd Lipham at 11:19 PM  

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To This Fundraiser

$13,526

MONEY RAISED
  •  
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  • Brenda Lipham

    $100

  • Harper Neal

    $100

  • Dave Appert

    $100

  • Anonymous

    $200

  • Jason Pappas

    $250

  • The Wymans

    $100

  • steve johnston

    $50

  • Ev Issa

    $100

  • The Yadda's

    $100

  • Aaron Carmack

    $250

  • The Cummings

    $100

  • The MacIsaacs

    $50

  • Vinny Lam

    $250

  • Anthony Rodgers

    $100

  • Sean Pink

    $50

  • Shirley Balogh

    $100

  • Brent and Canette

    $100

  • Mom & Dad

    $100

  • John Doran

    $100

  • Jim & Karen Harmer

    $100

  • JOHN AND DONNA DORAN

    $100

  • Jim Gibb

    $50

  • Peak Products Manufacturing

    $500

  • Mike Hoitt

    $100

  • Richard Kohler

    $200

  • Bern & Kim Kinard

    $200

  • Scott, Sheree, Dalton and Gabi White

    $500

  • The Wyman match

    $400

  • David Basto

    $200

  • STARTING BONUS

    $100

  • State #1

    $50

  • Alice Horak

    $100

  • State #2

    $50

  • Briley, Mack & Harper

    $50

  • Jim Hicks

    $100

  • Ramy and Rob Sharp

    $500

  • The O'Connor family

    $250

  • State #3

    $50

  • The Prabhus

    $100

  • Angus and Linda Williams

     

  • Bobby and Renata Walker

    $50

  • State #4

    $50

  • KHS Class of '52

    $50

  • The Jackson's

    $500

  • Uncle Albert & Aunt Ammie Lang

    $100

  • Harley5customs

    $500

  • Mark nord

    $50

  • Chris Mooney

    $50

  • The Greene Family

    $100

  • Ronnie Powell

    $100

  • Betty Bridges

    $25

  • Claudia Hood

    $100

  • Uncle Howard Lang

    $100

  • STATE #5

    $50

  • Scott & Robin Eads

    $100

  • State #6

    $50

  • Sam and Michelle Johnson

    $50

  • Brittany, Greg & Sena Schirm

    $1,000

  • Quinn Roberts

    $100

  • Diogi - rollover

    $25

  • Good Job, Be safe, GO BOLTS!!

    $25

  • State #7

    $50

  • Avery Properties, Inc.

    $100

  • Bill Wheeler

    $100

  • Bobby Fischer

    $100

  • Brian Verdugo

    $250

  • State #8

    $50

  • frank lyons

    $125

  • michael snyder

    $100

  • The Liphams

    $100

  • Province #1

    $50

  • Penn Family

    $250

  • State #9

    $50

  • State #10

    $50

  • State #11

    $50

  • Alan & Tami Mills

    $300

  • Derris Amsler

    $25

  • MeMe & Pop (Courtney)

    $26

  • Jeff, Susan, Megan, Lauren

    $150

  • Keith & Taree Hodge

    $1,000

  • Martin Cheryl and Colt Reynolds

    $100

  • David and Teresa Bass

    $100

  • Kevin, Sarah, Ella and Isaac Conner

    $100

  • Alexa Lipham

    $50

  • susan shapiro

    $100

  • States 12, 13, & 14

    $150

  • Road Donations -- Freebies

    $185

  • Road Cash

    $440

  • Violet Clarice Wagman

    $50

  • Hedy King

    $100

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135% Raised of $10,000 Goal

Fundraise for this Campaign

The Team: $13,526 TOTAL RAISED SO FAR

JOIN THE TEAM
Fundraiser Title

Boyd Lipham

Amount Raised

$13,426

 

134% Raised of $10,000 Goal

Fundraiser Title

Bill Wheeler

Amount Raised

$100

Donor Comments

Hedy King

Hedy King

DONATION: $100

2 years ago

Violet Clarice Wagman

Violet Clarice Wagman

DONATION: $50

Violet Clarice Wagman w/ Kathleen and Barbara from Nelsons Fruit Farm 2 years ago

Road Cash

Road Cash

DONATION: $440

Chris; Niagara -- 35, Deb; NY Camp -- 45, USS Badger -- 65, Moss and Penni -- 20, Kevin and Linda -- 20, Ricki -- 40, Oasis Ranch -- 20, Rob Elder -- 20, Vinny -- 10, Gordon -- 10 2 years ago

Road Donations -- Freebies

Road Donations -- Freebies

DONATION: $185

Total of the free meals and other gratuities garnered on the road. 2 years ago

States 12, 13, & 14

States 12, 13, & 14

DONATION: $150

Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine -- check! 2 years ago

susan shapiro

susan shapiro

DONATION: $100

2 years ago

Alexa Lipham

Alexa Lipham

DONATION: $50

2 years ago

Kevin, Sarah, Ella and Isaac Conner

Kevin, Sarah, Ella and Isaac Conner

DONATION: $100

2 years ago

David and Teresa Bass

David and Teresa Bass

DONATION: $100

Thank you for allowing us to have shared this journey daily with you and bless you for what you have done and continue to do for AFI. 2 years ago

Martin Cheryl and Colt Reynolds

Martin Cheryl and Colt Reynolds

DONATION: $100

We have truly enjoyed your amazing daily blog. 2 years ago