Skip to content

Help Bella fight to survive Cataracts !!

Organized by: Millie Von

Millie's Photo
Millie's Photo
Millie's Photo

THE STORY:

Bella is a beautiful 4 year old sweet dog she was found nearly dead her abusive past owner left her at a park to die, she was found dehydrated, really under weight, her eyes where shut closed suffering from mature Cataracts and diabetes. Everyone deserves a second chance and that is what I am willing to do for this great pup. Bella is suffering from an eye disease called Cataracts which makes her blind it can take years for it to develop, when I found her she had one eye swollen shut of how bad the disease got to her one eye, vet says her other eye is developing it quick. Let me explain what that is, like a camera, eyes have a clear lens inside them that is used for focusing. A cataract is any opacity within a lens. The opacity can be very small (incipient cataract) and not interfere with vision. It can involve more of the lens (immature cataract) and cause blurred vision. Eventually, the entire lens can become cloudy, and all functional vision lost. This is called a mature cataract. Some mature cataracts will transform over time into hypermature cataracts. Hypermature cataracts usually are reduced in size due to loss of water and proteins from the lens. This causes the lens to shrivel and the lens capsule to wrinkle—similar to a grape turning into a raisin. Hypermature cataracts vary in how cloudy they are. Some are completely cloudy, and others have clear areas that can allow some vision IF the rest of the eye is functional. Depending on the dog’s age and breed, it can take several months to years for a mature cataract to turn into a hypermature cataract. For a blind dog to again be able to see its owner, to play with toys, look out the window and actually see things—this is life-changing for canine patients and their owners. The procedures and equipment used to remove cataracts in dogs are the same as those used in humans, and this equipment is highly technical and very expensive. The two most costly instruments used are an operating microscope and a phacoemulsification machine. A small incision is made in the eye and a hole is made in the capsular bag that holds the lens. Phacoemulsification is then performed, in which a special probe ultrasonically emulsifies and removes the cataract (all of the lens contents inside the capsule). After the cloudy lens is removed, the empty lens capsule remains and is called the capsular bag. An artificial replacement lens, called an intraocular lens or IOL, is placed in the bag. The eye is closed with extremely small absorbable sutures. IOLs are either rigid polymer plastic lenses or soft foldable lenses. The choice of which type of IOL to place inside an eye during surgery is determined by the ophthalmologist. Because even the slightest damage to structures in the canine eye can have disastrous effects, cataract surgery is extremely delicate surgery and is performed under general anesthesia with high-magnification using an operating microscope. If both eyes are affected, usually both eyes are operated on at the same time—especially in diabetic dogs. After successful cataract surgery dogs see close to normal. After surgery, cataracts cannot recur. Some dogs require anti-inflammatory medication for several weeks, months, or lifetime following cataract surgery.Cataract surgery is a highly successful procedure, but there are risks. Chances of the patient having improved vision after surgery are high for most dogs (90%–95%). But 5% to 10% of dogs will not regain good vision due to complications, and (worst case scenario) may actually be permanently blind in one or both of the operated eyes. Can you help this young pup get her second chance she deserves on living a normal healthy life!!

$0

MONEY RAISED
  •  
  •  
  •  
Organized by

Millie Von

This is a direct to organizer fundraiser.

Donor Comments

Report this page — Let Us Know if you think this page is breaking the law or the CrowdRise Terms