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SAVE THE CHIMPS' Fundraiser:

Housing for Chimps with Special Needs

SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
SAVE THE CHIMPS' Photo
 

SAVE THE CHIMPS via Crowdrise
July 19, 2011

Read the biographies on Clay, Nuri, Scarlett and Thoto, chimpanzees in need of Special Housing.  See more

BENEFITING: SAVE THE CHIMPS

THE STORY:

Dozens of chimpanzees still wait for their chance to move to their permanent home at our Fort Pierce, Florida sanctuary. The chimpanzees who will reside in this new structure, are some of our most traumatized residents. Their special needs building is designed to be less intimidating than the 3-acre island housing of our larger social groups. This structure will make it easy to provide these chimps with access to both indoor and outdoor living areas.

Our goal is to raise $835,000.00 needed to complete this project.

Here is some background on the chimps who will benefit from the Special Needs Housing:

CLAY

Clay was born May 20, 1987 to mother Jody and father Mack.  Jody was a good mother, but only allowed to care for Clay for a mere 10 hours.  Clay was taken from her and raised in the nursery by humans.  When he was just two years old, he entered research, subjected to multiple research studies over several years.  Clay had to endure frequent anesthesia with Ketamine, blood draws, liver biopsies, and injection with mysterious “test materials.”  In one study, he had a lymph node surgically removed.  Clay was also used in a study of the toxic effects of Theophylline (an anti-asthma drug), ibuprofen, and Lovastatin (a cholesterol-reducing drug).  All of these drugs were already approved for use in humans before Clay was used in these experiments.  Clay was almost continuously used in invasive biomedical research experiments until 1999, when he was twelve years old. 

In 2002, Clay was rescued by Save the Chimps, where they found him living alone in “the Dungeon”.  His records indicated that he had occasionally lived with at least one other chimp, and there was no indication that he could not be socialized.  However, when he was introduced to another chimp for the first time, Clay was extremely aggressive.  Repeated attempts to socialize Clay with other chimps failed.  Much to our dismay, we found that it would not be possible for Clay to live with other chimps.  His years of solitude and torment had mentally scarred him for life, and he posed a danger to other chimps. 

Clay lives alone to this day, but he certainly seems to prefer it that way.  He is a happy, robust chimp who loves to play chase with his caregivers.  Because he lives alone, he gets extra special attention (and, yes, treats) from the staff of Save the Chimps.  His caregivers discovered that he enjoys painting, and he has produced some lovely masterpieces! 

NURI

Nuri, Born December 21, 1966, at Delta Primate Center, Louisiana, Parents #359 (Mother's Name Unknown) & Jerry

Nuri is probably one of the oldest chimps born in captivity.  Most chimps her age were born in the wild and brought to the US as babies.  She is a gentle, sometimes timid chimp who has emotional and physical scars from her decades in the laboratory.  When we first met her, she was isolated in "the Dungeon", and would scream in anguish when the lights were turned out at night.  Her knees are permanently bent, making it difficult for her to climb.  But she has embraced her new life with courage, and has made many beloved friends, including Liberty and Scarlett.  We believe she will find the courage to venture out into the wide open spaces of her island home as well!

SCARLETT

Scarlett was born at the Coulston Foundation laboratory on November 11, 1979. She was immediately taken from her mother, Cherry, and sent to the nursery to be raised by humans. Every month she was anesthetized in order to take blood samples for research studies.

When Scarlett was three years old, she was sent to another lab for research. Scarlett returned to the Coulston Foundation at the age of 16 to become part of the breeding program. She had two children, Jude and Josi, who were both taken from her immediately after their births.

Save the Chimps rescued Scarlett in September 2002, when it took custody of the chimpanzees at the former Coulston Foundation. Scarlett lived alone in a small and barren cage in a building dubbed “the Dungeon”. Save the Chimps also learned that Scarlett has epilepsy. At first there was a worry that her condition would prevent Scarlett from joining a social group because it might cause her to be attacked by other chimps frightened by her seizures. Fortunately, Scarlett’s seizures are now under control with medication.

Scarlett looks twice her age, not the young adult she is.

THOTO

Parents and Date of Birth Unknown

Thoto was a circus performer before he was sent to a lab, and ultimately was sold to the Coulston Foundation in the late 1980s.  He is missing most of his teeth, and it is possible they were all pulled while he was in the circus, perhaps in a vain attempt to make him safer to work with. 

Thoto spent nearly two decades in laboratory research before being rescued by Save the Chimps.  His journey to Florida was documented in the PBS Nature series documentary “Chimpanzees:  An Unnatural History.” 

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To This Fundraiser

$160

MONEY RAISED
  • Jen Feuerstein

    $50

  • Anonymous

    $10

  • Bob Ingersoll.Belle Ball

    $100

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0% Raised of $835,000 Goal

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The Team: $160 TOTAL RAISED SO FAR

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Fundraiser Title

SAVE THE CHIMPS

Amount Raised

$160

 

0% Raised of $835,000 Goal

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Donor Comments

Bob Ingersoll.Belle Ball

Bob Ingersoll.Belle Ball

DONATION: $100

6 years ago

Anonymous

Anonymous

DONATION: $10

6 years ago

Jen Feuerstein

Jen Feuerstein

DONATION: $50

In Memory of Carole Noon and in honor of all chimps in laboratories, past and present. 6 years ago