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International Bridges to Justice

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Kin Vibol

THE STORY:

 

BIOGRAPHY:

Kin Vibol was working in IBJ”s office in Takeo province (DRC1) since August 2011. He moved to IBJ”s office in Phnom Penh in December 2012. As a lawyer Vibol provides legal services to persons accused of crimes who cannot afford to pay for a lawyer themselves. He also organizes Street Law and Rural Education campaigns for indigent Cambodian citizens. Vibol is passionate about his work and is committed to helping the poor in rural areas who have limited knowledge about their legal rights. Prior to joining IBJ – between 2005 and 2008 – Vibol worked as a legal assistant for a local government official. He graduated in 2002 with a Bachelor’s Degree of Law from the Faculty of Law and Economic Sciences, and in 2005 with a Master’s Degree of Law from the Build Bright University. Vibol was born in the Banteaydey district in Pursat province.

 

SUCCESS STORY:

Acquitted after 10 years in Jail

On August 3, 2004, in a remote commune situated in Kampong Thom province, Sry Veng’s family (name changed) and their neighbors were sitting at home and quietly watching what was on TV that evening when three men burst into the house and shot Veng, assaulted his wife, and stole jewels from his neighbors’ house. Veng died as a result of his injuries while he was transported to the hospital by boat. In the aftermath of this traumatic incident, Veng’s wife started to work with the judicial police to identify the perpetrators and bring them to justice. She was able to describe two of the three aggressors.

 Sokem was living in a village nearby and had already been to see Veng and his family in the surroundings. On December 31, 2004, he was arrested by judicial police officers. Sokem did not understand what was happening and he was taken straight to the prison, to be held in pretrial detention. From that day on, he was to stay in jail for ten years. Shortly after his arrest and detention, he was taken to court where he was informed that he was charged with premeditated murder and use of illegal weapon, incurring life imprisonment according to article 200 of the Cambodian Criminal Code. No one informed him of his right to seek legal representation. He was languishing, waiting in prison prior to being summoned for his trial on March 13, 2006.

 Before the first trial hearing, the court assigned Sokem a lawyer that he just met one time before the lawyer had to defend his case in front of the judges. Sokem did not know whether he was a private lawyer, or a lawyer from the Bar Association of the Kingdom of Cambodia, assigned to represent his case pro bono. As a matter of fact, he was charged with a felony and, in this case, legal representation at the trial hearing is mandated by the Cambodian Criminal Code of Procedure.

 At that point, Sokem still did not know why he had been arrested and he did not understand the criminal procedure which was unfolding before his eyes. For the first hearing, Veng’s family who had joined the procedure as civil parties gave confused answers about the description of the alleged perpetrators. During the second trial hearing, they presented witnesses who did not clearly remember the physical appearance of the offender. But when they saw Sokem, they affirmed that they knew him. The court followed their testimony and sentenced Sokem to 15 years of imprisonment. Sokem does not remember what his lawyer said for his defense at that time, but he had clearly not brought exculpatory evidence in favor of his client. Yet, after the announcement of the decision, the lawyer advised Sokem to appeal the judgment. After that, Sokem did not hear anything on the development of his case. He was still in the Correction Center 3, a provincial prison located in the neighboring province of Kampong Cham, and only knew that his cases had been sent to Phnom Penh for the appeal process.   

 The Court of Appeal opened the case on February 19, 2010, six years after the fact. Sokem was not informed of the hearing and was not able to attend it. In compliance with Cambodian criminal procedure, when the accused does not appear for trial and there is no proof that he had knowledge of his citation to the court hearing, the Court of Appeal issued a “default judgment” in his absence (Cambodian Criminal Procedure Code, Article 362.). In this decision, the Court of Appeal upheld Sokem’s sentence.

 Late 2014, IBJ received the case as part of one of its projects with the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHOCHR) in Cambodia. Sokem’s case was one on the list of people identified by the UNOHCHR with appeal proceedings pending for more than five years and with no trace of their trial documents. The IBJ lawyer and lawyer assistant investigated at the Court of Appeal on Sokem’s case and found out that he was never notified of the Court of Appeal’s hearing and judgment. The IBJ team met Sokem in prison and informed him of the current status of his case. In these circumstances, the only action available for the defense of the accused person is to submit a motion against the default judgment once the accused has got actual knowledge of it. The motion has the effect of voiding the judgment which was issued in the absence of the accused. The IBJ lawyer submitted the motion to the Court of Appeal on December 24, 2014. As a result, the Court of Appeal had to entirely re-examine Sokem’s case.

In preparation for the new hearing, the IBJ lawyer met with Sokem’s family and friends and found out that he had an alibi against the accusation which had already cost him heavily. His friends could testify that at the time of the incident, Sokem was fishing with them in another place, far from the crime scene.

The IBJ lawyer convinced the witnesses to provide their testimony at the Court of Appeal, while at the same time arranging Sokem’s transportation for the 225 km separating CC3 from Phnom Penh for him to attend his trial. During the trial hearing, on February 20, 2015, the lawyer called the witnesses who, by their testimony, brought in the case an important exculpatory element. The lawyer also backed his defense strategy on the civil party’s hesitations and unclear answers regarding the identification of the offender. Becoming convinced of the weaknesses of the accusation against Sokem, the Court of Appeal acquitted him.

After 10 years spent in jail in very unclear circumstances, Sokem was able to walk out of the court room cleared of all charges when the Court of Appeal announced its final decision on March 9, 2015. Before this misfortune, Sokem did not know that organizations such as IBJ existed. He went through a very difficult time in prison, lacking proper food, appropriate care when he fell sick, and with only one or two visits from his family per year. His wife and four children could not afford frequent travels to the prison. Sokem entirely feels the meaning of the five years of imprisonment he was saved from thanks to IBJ’s intervention. Still recovering from this painful experience, Sokem is taking time to rest before having to find a new job to support his family and ensure that they have a brighter future.

 

SUCCESS STORY:

On December 9, 2014 Sophal and his wife Thea (name changed), parents of three children, have been released after almost three years and a half in prison, although there both were innocent.

Back in June 2011, the police found a man’s body in Koh Kong province. After investigation, it appeared that the man was murdered three months earlier, in March 2011. The police officers started to interrogate people and they asked Sophal and Thea to come to the police post but without telling them what it was about and they interrogated them separately. Sophal and Thea had a good alibi, there were visiting Sophal’s family, in Kandal province, about 350 kilometers away from Koh Kong.

Nevertheless, the police told them they found eye witnesses who saw them on the crime scene the day of the crime. Thea and Sophal denied the accusation and refused to sign the police record stating there were guilty. Police officers started to threaten them saying that if there were not cooperating and signing the confession the judge would sentence them to eighteen years of prison. After three days of threat and intimidation in police custody – which is illegal as “the maximum duration of any police custody is 48 hours” according to the Cambodian Code of Criminal Procedure - Thea and Sophal finally signed the police record with their wrongful confession. Furthermore, police officers did not inform them about their rights and did not let Sophal calling his friend alleging they had no battery on their phone.

The police record was sent to the prosecutor who interrogated Thea and Sophal. They denied the police record but they did not say that the police threatened them, fearing reprisals.

The trial hearings took place on February 6, 2012. A lawyer appointed by the court represented them but he met them for the first time the exact same day as their trial took place. Two eye witnesses testified they saw Thea and Sophal killing the man but they changed their version of facts with what they originally said to the police. The defense lawyer requested an acquittal explaining that Thea and Sophal were not in Koh Kong during the murder. Even the prosecutor raised the fact that the eye witnesses changed their testimony. Still, the trial judge sentenced them to 17 years in prison.

Thea and Sophal appealed on March 9, 2012. There is only one Court of Appeal in Cambodia and appeal cases are often pending for a very long time before being heard meanwhile accused people are languishing in jail. After two years in prison without any update about their appeal situation, Sophal met Mr. Ouk Vandeth, IBJ Country Director and Fellow when he was visiting Koh Kong prison to meet one of his clients. Unfortunately, IBJ does not have an office located in Koh Kong province and cannot provide legal aid on a full time basis. Nevertheless, Mr. Ouk Vandeth is regularly visiting the province to take cases of people languishing in prison.

Mr. Ouk Vandeth referred the case to the IBJ lawyer located at the Court of Appeal, Mr. Kin Vibol who investigated on the case and pushed the court to set a trial date. The hearings have been postponed several times, and the case was finally heard on November 19, 2014.

Mr. Kin Vibol explained that his clients were not in Koh Kong at the time of the crime, that there was no physical evidence proving there were guilty and questioned the reliability of the witnesses as they changed their testimony.

Finally, on December 1, 2014 the Appeal Court acquitted Thea and Sophal. Nevertheless, the Appeal Court General Prosecutor requested for cassation to Supreme Court so Thea and Sophal are not done with the justice.

They never had any problem with the police or the justice and they do not understand why they have been accused as they did not even know the victim. When they heard the acquittal verdict they felt relieved but also surprised. They did not trust the Cambodian justice system and thought they would be in prison for ever. They are deeply grateful to IBJ.

They are now very happy to be free, after three years and a half in prison, without seeing their three children who were with their grandmother in another, far province. Thea and Sophal are now going to go back to Koh Kong where Sophal was working in a plantation.

They hope this decision is the end of their nightmare and that they will be able to peacefully live their life with their family.

 

 

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MONEY RAISED
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The Team: $42,240 TOTAL RAISED SO FAR

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ramin hashemi

Amount Raised

$13,600

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Karen Tse

Amount Raised

$13,050

 

13% Raised of $100,000 Goal

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Noah Wong

Amount Raised

$13,000

 

100% Raised of $13,000 Goal

Fundraiser Title

Sanjeewa Liyanage

Amount Raised

$2,540

 

51% Raised of $5,000 Goal

Fundraiser Title

Hok Meng Eam

Amount Raised

$50

Fundraiser Title

Chan Reaseypheak

Amount Raised

$0

Fundraiser Title

Chheang Makara

Amount Raised

$0

Fundraiser Title

Kin Vibol

Amount Raised

$0

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