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Nandi Moore's Fundraiser:

Nandi Moore

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Nandi's Photo
Nandi's Photo
Nandi's Photo
Nandi's Photo
Nandi's Photo
Nandi Moore

THE STORY:

ALL WAYS UP FOUNDATION wrote -

1. How would a Perlman Foundation Scholarship benefit your educational goals? A Perlman Foundation Scholarship would greatly benefit my educational goals.  I plan to become a cardio-thoracic surgeon.  That is at least 13 years of formal education.  The school I plan to attend to major in biology is a private university with the cost of attendance of over $50,000 per year.  That will be over $200,000 in four years.  My family has planned for my education as much as possible, but never dreamed that a student like myself, with strong academics and great athletic ability in my sport, would find themselves struggling to go to college because of finances.  The truth is that for the state schools I am not eligible for financial aid as my family is in the middle income range.  I applied to only the best schools for my area of study—Stanford, UCI, UCLA, Willamette University, Santa Clara University, RPI, and Lehigh University—and the ones that I was accepted too did not come with merit scholarships, with one exception.  When I have inquired why, they have shared that even students with 4.0 GPAs did not automatically get Merit scholarships because of the extremely competitive applicant pools.  I have been recruited for swimming at the collegiate level, but only been offered partial scholarships for schools that would not best serve my career goals, so they are not viable options.  A Perlman Foundation Scholarship would help me attend my dream college and reduce the amount of debt I will have when I finish my 13 years of education.    2. Describe the world from which you come and why have you chosen to pursue higher education. My mother and grandmother, two strong, smart and confident women, describe the world from which I come from.  My grandmother is very courageous to put herself in a position that caused her to have to go to jail when she was younger. During the Civil Rights era my grandmother decided that she needed to stand up for what was right, for African Americans to have equal rights as all the other people in the United States. When she stood up to the police and told them about her perspective of Civil Rights issues, she was immediately arrested.  She was young and fearless, doing what was right regardless of the sacrifice it took.  She was also a college student at this time and had learned through pursuing higher education that the world was bigger than North Carolina and that everyone was entitled to certain rights and freedoms.  When my mom was 27, she gave birth to me. At the time she was still in college because she wanted to achieve the highest degree possible in her major field. As a single mother going to school was hard to handle, but she was able to do it because she wanted to set an example for her children and she has always achieved what she wants throughout her life by pushing through the hard and challenging times.  My mother and grandmother are my role models and it has never been a question if I would pursue higher education, only how high I would pursue it.   What they experienced while pursuing higher education lets me know that there will be barriers along the way, but that I will have the strength to overcome them.  I want to pursue higher education to achieve my future aspiration of becoming a cardio-thoracic surgeon.  This is not a short educational path, in fact it could take around 13 years, but this is my goal and because of the world I come from, I know I will do it.    3. What personal experiences and accomplishments or adversities have you overcome and why are they significant in your life? My dreams and aspirations have been shaped by my relationships with my family, especially my grandfather who was like a father to me. He became deeply ill and needed to have triple bypass surgery two years ago. I hoped that he would get better from the surgery, but because of a mistake during surgery the operation did not help. Over the next months my grandfather took his prescriptions faithfully, hoping they would heal his heart, instead later than same year, three days after Christmas, my grandfather passed away.  I was a sophomore then, in a new school, a new home, and no sense of what was to come. His death had a negative impact on my emotions and my grades that year. I was in grief most of that year, but I, also, knew I had to pull it together to make him proud of me. I asked myself, could anything have made a difference?  I knew that no one should ever have to endure what my family and I did because of a medical error. I also knew that my grandfather would not have needed the surgery had he been diagnosed earlier with heart disease.  It was then that I decided to become a heart specialist and surgeon. What happened to my grandfather had a huge impact on me. It made me want to change the world, specifically helping those with limited access to medical care and for those who are likely to have heart disease.  To reach this goal I researched programs to help me learn about cardio-thoracic surgeons, what they do and the techniques they use while performing surgery. I found the Shumway Surgical Skills Internship Program at the Stanford School of Medicine and was honored to be accepted into this very prestigious pre-medical internship for future cardio-thoracic surgeons.  During the six weeks of my internship I learned that I was gifted with my hands and that through surgery I could save lives and provide a service to those in need.  I wanted to give back and help others with heart disease who did not have affordable options for help.  Though I was tremendously saddened by my Granddaddy’s death, I will use this pain as the motivation to reach my career goal.   4. What makes you unique or special? My mom kept saying, “Nandi, you have to have a compelling story, something unique, and something that makes you standout!”  But to me, that was a challenge.  You see, I always considered myself a pretty average girl, doing pretty average things.  Sure, I swim competitively in Club and Varsity Swim throughout all my high school years with collegiate level times;  I am an honor student in the top 10% of my class and have belonged to the National Honor Society and the California Scholarship Federation since my freshman year; I am an ASB elected officer in the DFY-IT (Drug Free Youth In Town) club;  I am a Girl Scout and have been for most of my life (12 years) during which time I have completed my Bronze, Silver and now Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouting achieved by less than 10% of girls around the country; and involved in so much more including working internships and volunteering over 500 hours in community service throughout high school and somehow, even with all of this, I managed to maintain a 3.9 GPA, having 5 AP classes, 4 honors classes and 3 college level classes throughout my high school years.  Yes, I did a lot and I gave a lot, but in today’s competitive college going environment, this all seemed expected and pretty average to me.  It wasn’t until I was watching a commercial one day with my mom about genealogy that I would begin to realize that I did have something unique to share, something that made me different and something that made me stand out from the pack—my family history.  For the first eight years of my life, it was just my mom and I.  I never asked about my father, but when he decided he wanted to get to know me, my whole world would change, literally.  My father grew up in the Congo and Mozambique; he speaks six languages including English fluently.  He came to America and attended high school and college in northern California.  His parents had also come to America for college and met through the International student organization.  My father’s family was a mixture of cultures that ran through my blood, making me unique and different.  If I were to name it, I would be an Afro-Caribbean European American.  My father was part French, part Grenadian and part Congolese.  My mother was African-American with

$200

MONEY RAISED
  • Mike Clark & Charmaine de Mello

    $100

  • Cameorn & Christy Myronowicz

    $100

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4% Raised of $5,000 Goal

The Team: $200 TOTAL RAISED SO FAR

Fundraiser Title

Nandi Moore

Amount Raised

$200

 

4% Raised of $5,000 Goal

Fundraiser Title

Michael Clark

Amount Raised

$0

Donor Comments

Cameorn & Christy Myronowicz

Cameorn & Christy Myronowicz

DONATION: $100

We wish you a bright future! 4 years ago

Mike Clark & Charmaine de Mello

Mike Clark & Charmaine de Mello

DONATION: $100

4 years ago