Skip to content

New tennis wheelchair

Organized by: Adil Boutahli

Adil's Photo

THE STORY:

Adil Boutahli now calls the evening of Jan. 10, 2014, "a night like no other." It was a Friday, and Boutahli had just said good night to his co-worker at a Pennsauken 7-Eleven as the man finished his shift. Boutahli would be working the graveyard shift, and as usual, things were quiet. Then, just after midnight, three masked men came into the store, demanding that Boutahli hand over cartons of cigarettes as well as all of the cash in his register. Some of the money had just been transferred out of the till, and an automated system kept the register locked for a few minutes after the transfer. When Boutahli couldn't open the register fast enough, one of the robbers whipped him in the head with a pistol. "When it's a robbery they need [the register to open] right away," said Boutahli last week as he sat in the Camden County apartment where his mother now helps take care of him. "The first time, it didn't open." Boutahli, a tall, broad man who had played professional soccer in his native Morocco, collapsed. He was ordered back on his feet to try to open the register again, his head still reeling. He got the drawer open on his second attempt, but Boutahli still couldn't quite catch his balance. He lurched involuntarily forward. "I was getting my balance. They think I'm trying to call the cops or trying to grab something, and that time, they shot me." Before fleeing with the two other suspects, the gunman paused on his way out the door, shooting Boutahli four times — twice in the abdomen and once in each arm. A customer found him a few minutes later. He spent several days in a coma at Cooper Hospital in Camden, and spent months in a rehabilitation hospital in Philadelphia. "It was a lot of surgery," said Boutahli, now 30. More than a year after that night, he has reached out to news media not just to talk about his long recovery, but to thank the people who saved him. "Life is hard, in general," he said, sitting in a wheelchair he's working hard not to use anymore. "Something can always happen. Accidents, gunshots." Boutahli's outlook these days is a complicated one. He strove to be as helpful and friendly as he could as a clerk, but now, chronic back pain keeps him from staying on his feet for long periods. He can walk for up to a mile at a time, but he needs a companion to help him if he falls. And he wants to stay positive, but he is still haunted by the shooting. To make matters worse, his attackers have yet to be caught. "My mind is always changing," he said. "I used to drive. I used to play soccer. If I want to go somewhere, I can't go by myself. I don't sleep good. I have stress sometimes." More than anything, Boutahli misses the independence that came with his athletic lifestyle. He first came to the United States in 2009, and played goalkeeper in a club soccer league in North Jersey before moving further south. "I was looking for work, for school and to help my family," he said. "Everybody likes to travel." Boutahli worked at a Burger King and a Burlington Coat Factory before joining 7-Eleven. He was a favorite of the customers in the stores where he worked, wherefriends called him a "soft-hearted guy." "He's like my younger brother," said Wasif "Zack" Mir, a former employer, to theSouth Jersey Times in 2014. "That day he went to work like normal, and he never expected people to come in and shoot him like an animal." Boutahli's friends said immediately after the robbery that they were frustrated by the lack of security under which many 7-Eleven employees work. Boutahli also made a point of mentioning that no one from 7-Eleven's corporate offices checked on him while he was in the hospital. "I'm angry, absolutely," he said. "You work for a big company, and not one person comes. "I want to help people. I can like everybody, and I can respect everybody. But I can't help anybody right now. Right now I have to care for myself. I'm thinking all the time about what happened." Boutahli's days now consist of mainly physical therapy, meetings with a psychologist and wheelchair tennis. "You get bored if you stay home all the time," he noted. "If you can get motivated, you can walk again." But it's not the same as his soccer days, and his doctors still don't know when he'll be able to return to work. As he spoke with a reporter last week, he discussed his newest challenge: consultations for reconstructive surgeries that would remove his colostomy bag and let him use the bathroom normally. He says he doesn't want money, or donations of any kind. Rather, he wants people to know about those who helped him. That starts with everyone from the customer who found him lying on the floor. "The client, I do not know right now but I would like to meet him in the future," Boutahli said. "I'm appreciative of everybody. Thank God, and the medical staff, and police and firemen." I’m a wheelchair tennis players who competes for state of New Jersey. My success started in 2015 when I achieved a United States of America top 10 ranking in my division. I started competing in wheelchair tennis in the summer of 2015. My success to date is noted by winning the doubles match and runner up for singles match during the Magee Wheelchair Tennis Tournament in 8/2015, winner of doubles and singles match in the USTA Middle States Wheelchair Championships Wilmington, DE 9/2015, and doubles match runner-up and singles match winner for the Cajun Classic Wheelchair Tennis Tournament Southern Championship in Baton Rouge, Louisiana 3/2016. I continue to train regularly with my trainer and teammates from Magee Rehab with the intent of improving my skills so I can compete in more tournaments throughout the United States this year. Prior to my spinal cord injury I was an avid soccer player, playing professionally for several years. Since I’m no longer physically able to play soccer I have found a new passion in wheelchair tennis which I’m determined to excel in by dedicating more time to this sport. In hopes of reaching my goal to participate in close to 15 tournaments this season, thanks sincerly adil boutahli ABOUT THIS CAMPAIGN Adil Boutahli now calls the evening of Jan. 10, 2014, "a night like no other." It was a Friday, and Boutahli had just said good night to his co-worker at a Pennsauken 7-Eleven as the man finished his shift. Boutahli would be working the graveyard shift, and as usual, things were quiet. Then, just after midnight, three masked men came into the store, demanding that Boutahli hand over cartons of cigarettes as well as all of the cash in his register. Some of the money had just been transferred out of the till, and an automated system kept the register locked for a few minutes after the transfer. When Boutahli couldn't open the register fast enough, one of the robbers whipped him in the head with a pistol. "When it's a robbery they need [the register to open] right away," said Boutahli last week as he sat in the Camden County apartment where his mother now helps take care of him. "The first time, it didn't open." Boutahli, a tall, broad man who had played professional soccer in his native Morocco, collapsed. He was ordered back on his feet to try to open the register again, his head still reeling. He got the drawer open on his second attempt, but Boutahli still couldn't quite catch his balance. He lurched involuntarily forward. "I was getting my balance. They think I'm trying to call the cops or trying to grab something, and that time, they shot me." Before fleeing with the two other suspects, the gunman paused on his way out the door, shooting Boutahli four times — twice in the abdomen and once in each arm. A customer found him a few minutes later. He spent several days in a coma at Cooper Hospital in Camden, and spent months in a rehabilitation hospital in Philadelphia. "It was a lot of surgery," said Boutahli, now 30. More than a year after that night, he has reached out to news media not just to talk about his long recovery, but to thank the people who saved him. "Life is hard, in general," he said, sitting in a wheelchair he's working hard not to use anymore. "Something can always happen. Accidents, gunshots." Boutahli's outlook these days is a complicated one. He strove to be as helpful and friendly as he could as a clerk, but now, chronic back pain keeps him from staying on his feet for long periods. He can walk for up to a mile at a time, but he needs a companion to help him if he falls. And he wants to stay positive, but he is still haunted by the shooting. To make matters worse, his attackers have yet to be caught. "My mind is always changing," he said. "I used to drive. I used to play soccer. If I want to go somewhere, I can't go by myself. I don't sleep good. I have stress sometimes." More than anything, Boutahli misses the independence that came with his athletic lifestyle. He first came to the United States in 2009, and played goalkeeper in a club soccer league in North Jersey before moving further south. "I was looking for work, for school and to help my family," he said. "Everybody likes to travel." Boutahli worked at a Burger King and a Burlington Coat Factory before joining 7-Eleven. He was a favorite of the customers in the stores where he worked, wherefriends called him a "soft-hearted guy." "He's like my younger brother," said Wasif "Zack" Mir, a former employer, to theSouth Jersey Times in 2014. "That day he went to work like normal, and he never expected people to come in and shoot him like an animal." Boutahli's friends said immediately after the robbery that they were frustrated by the lack of security under which many 7-Eleven employees work. Boutahli also made a point of mentioning that no one from 7-Eleven's corporate offices checked on him while he was in the hospital. "I'm angry, absolutely," he said. "You work for a big company, and not one person comes. "I want to help people. I can like everybody, and I can respect everybody. But I can't help anybody right now. Right now I have to care for myself. I'm thinking all the time about what happened." Boutahli's days now consist of mainly physical therapy, meetings with a psychologist and wheelchair tennis. "You get bored if you stay home all the time," he noted. "If you can get motivated, you can walk again." But it's not the same as his soccer days, and his doctors still don't know when he'll be able to return to work. As he spoke with a reporter last week, he discussed his newest challenge: consultations for reconstructive surgeries that would remove his colostomy bag and let him use the bathroom normally. He says he doesn't want money, or donations of any kind. Rather, he wants people to know about those who helped him. That starts with everyone from the customer who found him lying on the floor. "The client, I do not know right now but I would like to meet him in the future," Boutahli said. "I'm appreciative of everybody. Thank God, and the medical staff, and police and firemen." I’m a wheelchair tennis players who competes for state of New Jersey. My success started in 2015 when I achieved a United States of America top 10 ranking in my division. I started competing in wheelchair tennis in the summer of 2015. My success to date is noted by winning the doubles match and runner up for singles match during the Magee Wheelchair Tennis Tournament in 8/2015, winner of doubles and singles match in the USTA Middle States Wheelchair Championships Wilmington, DE 9/2015, and doubles match runner-up and singles match winner for the Cajun Classic Wheelchair Tennis Tournament Southern Championship in Baton Rouge, Louisiana 3/2016. I continue to train regularly with my trainer and teammates from Magee Rehab with the intent of improving my skills so I can compete in more tournaments throughout the United States this year. Prior to my spinal cord injury I was an avid soccer player, playing professionally for several years. Since I’m no longer physically able to play soccer I have found a new passion in wheelchair tennis which I’m determined to excel in by dedicating more time to this sport. In hopes of reaching my goal to participate in close to 15 tournaments this season, thanks sincerly adil boutahli

$0

MONEY RAISED
  •  
  •  
  •  
Organized by

Adil Boutahli

This is a direct to organizer fundraiser.

Donor Comments

Adil is still setting up this fundraiser so please check back so you can support New tennis wheelchair .

Report this page — Let Us Know if you think this page is breaking the law or the CrowdRise Terms