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Chim Mvula's Fundraiser:

No Child Left Behind

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Chim Mvula via Crowdrise
March 12, 2013

Help us fundraise for these children attending ECD in Zambia.Only 17.1% of children in Zambia pass through some form of ECD.Support us.  See more

BENEFITING:

Chim Mvula

THE STORY:

Presently three out of four Zambians live in poverty and more than half of them are extremely poor and unable to meet their minimum nutritional needs. In rural parts of the country about 83 per cent of the inhabitants are poor, and 71 per cent of them are extremely poor. In Zambia, HIV/AIDS has devastated individual families, weakened all areas of the public sector, and threatened long-term national development. Currently, over 20,000 infants are newly infected each year. There are an estimated 1.2 million orphans in Zambia (2009).Over 12,200 children die from diarrhea each year in Zambia and only around 57% of children in Zambia attend school.

CHILDHOPE-ZAMBIA is a registered non -Governmental, non-profit making organization working with children, women and the youths in Zambia (Africa) whose charity number is ORS/109/35/2091. We are trying to raise funds to support child education, health, nutrition, water and sanitation. We are also fundraising to fight HIV/AIDS and alleviate poverty.

 

1. Rationale

 

Despite significant recent progress, the Republic of Zambia remains among the poorest countries in the world. Zambia’s current population is estimated at 13 million people, with an average annual per capita income of US$ 1,500 in 2008 (World Bank 2010). With an under-5 mortality rate of 120 per 1000, and an HIV prevalence rate of over 15% among adults, life expectancy at birth continues to be below 50 years (UNESCO 2010; World Bank 2010).Zambia’s public education system faces a number of challenges, including funding constraints, a multilingual student body, and isolation of rural schools. Most children do enroll in school, and in fact gross intake rates and gross enrollment ratios for lower levels of primary school have been above 100% in recent years.1 However, 25% of students drop out before completing seven years of primary education, and in 2007 the GER for secondary school was only 43% (UNESCO 2010). Early childhood care and education (ECCE) remains underdeveloped, with only 17% of new first-graders benefitting having benefitted from an ECCE experience (UNESCO 2010).Zambian children today continue to be threatened by a high burden of ill health in general, and infectious diseases in particular. According to the national Health Management Information System (HMIS), malaria continues to be the most salient health issue for children under the age of five in Zambia, with 32% of all under-5 deaths attributed to malaria in 2005 (HMIS, 2009).Since 2005, Zambia has made significant progress with respect to child health, and in particular with respect to malaria. Under the direction of the Ministry of Health, the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) has been coordinating the efforts of more than twenty-five national and international partners (Zambia Ministry of Health 2008). Following WHO guidelines, the National Malaria Control Programme has four main components: distribution of preventive malaria drugs among pregnant women, indoor residual spraying of households (IRS), supply of front-line therapy drugs to all health facilities, and distribution of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) to households. Due to initial capacity constraints, this program was phased in over time. In 2005, full ITN coverage was achieved in only 2 of Zambia’s 72 districts; in 2006, the goal was reached in 12 districts; and in 2007, about two-thirds of all districts had reached target net coverage. Similarly, IRS was initially limited to 15 districts, and gradually scaled up to a majority of urban areas over time. While the exact magnitude of the program’s health effects cannot yet be fully estimated, preliminary evidence from both the HMIS and two waves of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in 2002 and 2008 suggests that improvements in child health have been large, with full net coverage lowering child mortality by about 20%, and the likelihood of child fever by up to 50% (Ashraf, Fink et al. 2010).

 

 

2. HOW YOU CAN HELP

Please help CHILDHOPE-ZAMBIA raise the necessary funds to keep our programs active for the vulnerable children and those affected by HIV/AIDS in Zambia. Our goal is to support Child Health and Education –ECCDE so as to prepare children for schooling with an increase in quality access, achievement, retention and good health. Your generous donations will help fund the construction and rehabilitation of Early Childhood Care Development and Education centers (ECCDE), train ECCDE caregivers, pre-school teachers; Parent Management Committees (PMC).We will also train parents in safe motherhood and local officials in the technical supervision and monitoring of ECCDE programs. CHILDHOPE-ZAMBIA will introduce vitamin A and iron supplementation programs and provide therapeutic food supplements for a limited period to correct faltering growth among the children. We will set up a community-based system for monitoring young children’s growth and educate parents and childcare providers about child nutrition. CHILDHOPE will train adults in targeted households in income-generating activities (Linking them to the Ministry of Agriculture co-operatives and livestock including Zambia National Farmers Union). We will set up training programs for local health and nutrition workers and enhance their collaboration. CHILDHOPE will increase the number of supervisors of local village workers and the quality of supervision and provide basic drugs and food supplements to mothers and young children. The organization will provide and replenish educational and play materials to the ECCDE centers. The organization will educate pregnant and nursing women about nutrition and health and support prenatal monitoring and care. We will provide food supplements for women at risk of delivering low birth-weight babies refer potential high-risk cases to facilities with more sophisticated obstetrical services. CHILDHOPE will provide postnatal care and promote breastfeeding, offer nutrition supplements for malnourished expectant mothers. We will conduct regular health checkups and monitor young children’s growth and provide de-worming, immunization and other basic health support. We will sensitize community members on ECCDE, Provide teaching and learning materials and support ECCDE center feeding.

3.OUR BUDGET

Categories

Amount ($)

Total program cost($)

1.Construction and rehabilitation of ECCDE centers

150,000

150,000

2.Training of ECCDE caregivers

60,000

60,000

3.Training of pre-school teachers

40,000

40,000

4.Training of Parent Management Committees

30,000

30,000

5.Training parents in Safe motherhood

50,000

50,000

6.Training local officials in the technical supervision and monitoring of ECCDE programs.

45,000

45,000

7. Provision  of vitamin A and iron supplementation

15,000

15,000

8.Provision of  therapeutic food supplements

80,000

80,000

9. Community-based system for monitoring young children’s growth.

10,000

10,000

10. Educating  parents and childcare providers about child nutrition

35,000

35,000

11. Training households in income-generating activities

50,000

50,000

12. Training for local health and nutrition workers

45,000

45,000

13. Provision of basic drugs and food supplements to mothers and young children.

10,000

10,000

14.  Provision of and replenishing educational and play material to the ECCDE centers.

80,000

80,000

15. Educating pregnant and nursing women about nutrition and health and support prenatal monitoring and care.

30,000

30,000

16. Provision of food supplements to women at risk of delivering low birth-weight babies and referring potential high-risk cases to facilities with more sophisticated obstetrical services.

65,000

65,000

17. Provision of postnatal care and promote breastfeeding   and offer nutrition supplements for malnourished expectant mothers.

50,000

50,000

18. Conducting regular health checkups and monitoring young children’s growth, providing de-worming, immunization and other basic health support

15,000

15,000

19. Sensitize community members on ECCDE

15,000

15,000

20. Provide ECCDE teaching and learning materials

35,000

35,000

21.Supporting ECCDE center feeding

20,000

20,000

Grand-Total:

 

930,000

 

4., SPREAD THE WORD

Share this page with your friends and encourage them to join our wonderful network of supporters. Together we can help deliver smiles and joy to the children who need it most, those living in the rural areas of Zambia. To see CHILDHOPE-ZAMBIA in action, follow us on Facebook. You can also watch our videos and pictures on this advert on crowdrise. You can see more of our work on www.Zambian.com/ChildHopeZambia.

You may also mail a check to:

CHILDHOPE-ZAMBIA

Lotti House, 4th floor, Suite ‘M’ 

Cairo Road, Northend

P.o.Box 39481

Lusaka, Zambia.

Email us at: childhopezambia@zambian.com or call +260-211-22168 or Mobile number: +260-977773243 with any questions.

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Donor Comments

Chim is working on selecting a charity so you can support No Child Left Behind.